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Association between apparent temperature and acute coronary syndrome admission in Rasht, Iran
  1. Mohammad Taghi Moghadamnia1,
  2. Ali Ardalan1,
  3. Alireza Mesdaghinia2,
  4. Kazem Naddafi2,
  5. Mir Saeed Yekaninejad3
  1. 1 Department of Disaster Public Health, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran
  2. 2 Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences; Institute for Environment Research, Tehran, Iran
  3. 3 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  1. Correspondence to Professor Ali Ardalan, Department of Disaster Public Health, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; aardalan{at}tums.ac.ir

Abstract

Objective Our objective was to assess the relations between apparent temperature and incidence of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in Rasht, Iran.

Methods We used a time-series analysis to investigate the relationship between apparent temperature and hospital admission from 2005 to 2014. Distributed lag non-linear models were used to estimate the association between ACS hospitalisation and apparent temperature. To examine the high-temperature effect on ACS hospital admission, the relative risk of ACS hospital admission associated with high temperature, the 99th percentile of temperature (34.7°C) compared with the 75th percentile of temperature (26.9°C), was calculated. To assess the cold effect on ACS hospital admission, the relative risk of ACS hospital admission associated with cold temperature, the first percentile of temperature (−0.2°C) compared with the 25th percentile of temperature (8.2°C), was evaluated.

Results The cumulative effect of hot exposure on ACS admissions was statistically significant, with a relative risk of 2.04 (95% CI 1.06 to 4.16). The cumulative effect of cold temperature on ACS admissions was found to be non-significant. The highest risk of ACS admission in women was in 38°C (RR, 2.03, 95%  CI 1.04 to 4.18). The effect of hot temperature on ACS admission occurred immediately (lag 0) (RR, 1.09, 95%  CI 1.001 to 1.19).

Conclusions The high apparent temperature is correlated with a higher ACS admission especially on the same day. These findings may have implications for developing intervention strategies to reduce and prevent temperature-related morbidity especially in the elderly.

  • coronary artery disease
  • acute coronary syndrome
  • atherosclerosis
  • public health
  • Education

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Footnotes

  • Present affiliation The present affiliation of Mohammad Taghi Moghadamnia is: Department of Medical - Surgical Nursing, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Guilan, Rasht, Iran

  • Present affiliation The present affiliation of Ali Ardalan is: Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, Harvard University, Massachusetts, cambridge, United States

  • Contributors All authors of the manuscript certify that they had the same contribution in writing the manuscript. MTM: developing and planning the research idea and preparing the final manuscript. AA: supervision and responsibility for the organisation. AM: responsibility for conducting a literature search. KN: conduct and reporting of the work. MSY: analysis of data and preparing the primary draft on outputs.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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